wholesale nhl jerseys cheap hockey jerseys cheap jerseys cheap authentic jerseys authentic jerseys wholesale adidas soccer jerseys wholesale cheap jersey wholesale

Part 1 – Chapter 3

Part 1

CHAPTER THREE

THE NUMBER ONE PROBLEM IN AMERICA IS 70% OF WHITE MEN.

It would seem, that one hundred and fifty two years after Abraham Lincoln Emancipated the Confederated Southern States Slaves, 99% who because of the strict southern laws against educating slaves, could not read, write or do math, held no land, did not know where they were, had no money, did not have any understanding of the American or European financial system, had no real understanding of the power of money, and held no power over their lives whatsoever. And so with all that against them, you would still think that 150 years after the civil war, that the great majority of African Americans should have been assimilated into the American dream of economic middle class wealth and prosperity. 

But, imagine ten million slaves freed and out on the road in the American South for the first time, but not really free, all different skin colors, because of the sexual ferociousness of the plantation slave master, slave farmers and White men in general for African and Black women. There were hundreds of thousands, millions of just about white slaves, high yella light skinned slaves, light and bright skinned slaves, light brown skinned slaves, brown skinned slaves, slaves of all different colors mixed with the millions of White men who had raped and impregnated the mothers, grandmothers, great grandmothers, great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandmothers of these slaves for over two hundred years in America.   

And then imagine, ten million freed slaves. Hated by just about every White person in America, especially in the south. Hated and beaten, maligned, despised, used, abused, spit on, made fun of, talked about, no money, no clothes, no horse, no buggy, no housing, no lodging, homeless, lynched, burned, starving, stinking, unwashed, disrespected, no jobs, no work, no money, segregated against, terrorized, no citizenship, shot, killed, hunted, raped, sodomized, arrested, blamed for theft, and a million things like rapes that they didn’t do, then lynched.

Hated by every White man you see, because they can’t get over what they had done to us and it made them hate us even more for being in existence, taking up space, trying to take jobs away from decent White folks, breathing the very air that White people breathe, they kept them out, segregated against them. White men passed laws against the Coloreds very existence, until they went back into slavery as sharecroppers with no economic security whatsoever, and no financial knowledge of the White American financial system at all.

My Great-Great-Great Grandmother would have been on that same road, where some slaves went west to find their manhood working on the railroads or becoming what would be called Buffalo Soldiers for the United States Army and others went north on what would be the first mass migration of African Americans in America. 

My Great-Great-Great Grandmother who was now forty seven years old, black skinned as Africa, had birthed eight children, some for her slave masters and some from her husbands, five who had been sold. She went north, walking from the cotton fields of Georgia, with her three all different colored, remaining children, one of whom was my Great-Great Grandmother born in slavery in Georgia and having her second child, my Great Grandmother born in Virginia in 1866.

A freeborn girl named Daisy, who I would know in the fifties as a skittish, tall, skinny old woman, who talked in a high pitched voice and who along with her husband named Daddy Herbert, and her assorted sisters and aunts, had come down through the ages, through Virginia, Baltimore, Maryland, to Boston, Massachusetts along with my Grandmother and her two sisters and one brother, where they would face like millions of other African Americans, thousands of laws passed legally and illegally across the south and north that would stop them from attaining decent jobs, a decent education, decent housing and restricted to a life of poverty inside a city ghetto or rural ghetto, where they and their men, for the least offense, could be lynched, burnt, castrated and their limbs pulled apart for the enjoyment of White people. 

There are a tens of tens of millions of White people in America today, who’s grandparents, great grandparents, great-great grandparents, great-great-great grandparents had picnics, barbeques, and social gatherings while watching black men being lynched, burnt alive, castrated and pulled apart, and black women, disfigured, lynched, burnt alive, and shot numerous times as sport for White men. 

The movies “Birth of A Nation” and “Gone With the Wind”, became the foundation of what White people thought Black people were like and has rippled down White family through White family for over a hundred years.

Every White family in America from Montana to Arizona, from Wyoming to California to Florida. From Massachusetts to Georgia, from Alabama to Illinois, from Mississippi to New York, every White family, every White person, in every state and city and town and village in America saw The Birth of a Nation. A 1915 American silent drama film directed by D. W. Griffith and based on the novel and play The Clansman, both by Thomas Dixon, Jr.  

W. Griffith co-wrote the screenplay with Frank E. Woods, and co-produced the film with Harry Aitken. It was released on February 8, 1915. The film was originally presented in two parts, separated by an intermission. It was the first 12-reel film in America.  The film chronicles the relationship of two families in Civil War and Reconstruction-US era: the pro-Union Northern Stonemans and the pro-Confederacy Southern Cameroons over the course of several years. The assassination of President Abraham Lincoln by John Wilkes Booth is dramatized.

The film was a commercial success, but was highly controversial owing to its portrayal of Black men played by White actors in blackface as unintelligent and sexually aggressive towards White women, and the portrayal of the Ku Klux Klan whose original founding is dramatized as a heroic force.

There were nationwide African-American protests against The Birth of a Nation including in Boston. The NAACP spearheaded an unsuccessful campaign to ban the film, while thousands of White Bostonians and millions of White people across the nation flocked to see the film.  The film is also credited as one of the events that inspired the formation of the “second era” Ku Klux Klan at Stone Mountain, Georgia, in the same year. The Birth of a Nation was used as a recruiting tool for the KKK. Under the segregationist Ku Klux Klansman Democratic Party President of the United States of America, President Woodrow Wilson, it became the first motion picture to be screened in the White House.

Despite the film’s controversial content, Griffith’s innovative film techniques make it one of the most influential films in the commercial film industry, and it is often ranked as one of the greatest American films of all time and every White person in America saw it.

With Gone With The Wind every white family in America from Montana to Arizona, from Wyoming to California to Florida, from Massachusetts to Georgia, from Alabama to Illinois, from Mississippi to New York, every white family, every white person, in every state and city and town and village in America saw Gone With The Wind a 1939 American epic historical romance film adapted from Margaret Mitchell’s Pulitzer-winning 1936 novel.

It was produced by David O. Selznick of Selznick International Pictures, directed by Victor Fleming and starred Clark Gable, Vivian Leigh and Hattie McDaniel, both films have shaped the thoughts of every White American and every White American family towards Black Americans and how White Americans think Black people act, talk, think, what we think about, who we are and how White Americans related to Black Americans in a very negative way for three generations.

Only the advent of MTV and possibly the Bill Cosby show both created in the early 1980’s began to change the thinking of how a new younger generation of White children and teenagers began to see Black people in a more positive light, as human beings, as more Black people began to show up on National Television. Well, that is until Gangster Rap took over.